Breaking Waves: Ocean News

09/24/2020 - 10:20
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Seen from the Lighthouse – what's happening now? Happy 75th Birthday United Nations! UN Biodiversity Summit – humanity at a crossroads Time to take off our gloves in the icy fight for Antarctic protection Ocean Signals – short announcements Waves on the Horizon – what's coming up? Better late than never – 2021 is the new, and hopefully improved, 2020 Paris Peace Forum – turning the page on the pandemic Ocean Reflection – a look back at what's been happening Mauritius oil tanker disaster – fueling trouble in paradise Uniting for Caribbean action Maldives deeper into coral reef research Other Key News Recent Reports Latest Virgin Unite Blogs   Welcome back! While The Navigator has been anchored over the Northern summer we hope you have also had a chance for some R&R – and we don’t mean just because you are locked-in! Sadly, the world is not as we hoped it would be for our “back to school” September special. For a start, lots of kids are not back at school. COVID-19 cases are still tragically rising in some regions, and returning with a miserable vengeance in others. Meanwhile, humanity received its 2020 Biodiversity Report Card. Turns out we’re failing biodiversity big time and when it comes to meeting our Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) we really could good do much, much better. So, we’ll be looking out for bold solutions at the UN Biodiversity Summit at the end of the month. With the UN celebrating its 75th year, it is time to remind world leaders about the power of multilateralism. Solving these planetary problems and Building Back Bluer and Better is an opportunity we have to share with the whole class! -->      Seen from the Lighthouse – What's happening now? Happy 75th Birthday United Nations!  On 24th October it will be exactly 75 years since the UN Charter entered into force in 1945. A moment to celebrate, reflect on the past, and imagine the future. The UN has a lot to be proud of with an impressive list of achievements from the past 75 years under its belt – from 170 peace settlements; 560 multilateral treaties; deploying 70 peacekeeping operations; providing food to 90 million people every year, to name just a few. Sadly, this year there will be no colourful in-person events to mark this anniversary. Instead, a UN General Assembly like no other is currently underway in New York. “Quiet corridors, full programme” is the order of the day at the first ever mostly virtual UNGA. Instead of motorcades and handshakes we will see world leaders beaming in from around the globe to a sparsely filled, socially distanced halls. The theme of #UN75 is “The future we want, the United Nations we need: reaffirming our collective commitment to multilateralism – confronting COVID-19 through effective multilateral action.” As titles go, it doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, but it is what we need. The big question: will we get it? And that, fellow navigators, is up to us.   We must use this anniversary, against the unprecedented global backdrop of COVID-19, to reassert the importance of multilateralism and meeting the SDGs. Which is precisely what United Nations Secretary General (UNSG) Antonio Guterres stressed at the inaugural high-level SDG Moment on 18th September.  This 75th birthday presents a critical chance for the globe to save itself. But the challenges are immense. Countries are lagging far behind the SDGs to protect land and Ocean ecosystems; not a single country has met the 2020 targets of SDG14: Life Below Water; and alarming new research is revealing how diseases can sweep through the sea. As the world approaches the tragic threshold of 1 million COVID-19 deaths, the World Health Organization (WHO) is lamenting how underprepared we were for this pandemic and appealing to governments to learn lessons and invest in targeted, preventative measures now. Nature conservation is key. After all, analysis shows that the cost of preventing further pandemics over the next decade by protecting wildlife and forests would equate to just 2% of the estimated financial damage caused by COVID-19. The links between biodiversity, Ocean, climate and human health have never been clearer. And, while the UN may not be perfect – faced with so many global threats – humanity has never needed it more. The Navigator wishes a very Happy Birthday to our United Nations and all who sail in her!   UN Biodiversity Summit – humanity at a crossroads  A very timely Summit on Biodiversity is also being held at the UN during the General Assembly, on 30th September, aimed at spurring on “Urgent Action on Biodiversity for Sustainable Development.” The recent report that the world has shamefully failed to meet a single target to stem the destruction of wildlife and life-sustaining ecosystems in the last decade will undoubtedly cast a shadow on the event – but will it serve to catalyse urgent action?   Global Biodiversity Outlook 5, launched on 15th September, confirmed that the international community has not fully achieved any of the 20 Aichi biodiversity targets: natural habitats continue to disappear, vast numbers of species are threatened by extinction due to human activities, and US$500bn of environmentally damaging government subsidies have not been eliminated. What’s more, this damning assessment comes hot on the heels of the WWF Living Planet Report 2020 revelation that animal populations have plummeted by 68% since 1970, driven by human overconsumption, population growth and intensive agriculture. And it is not just other species being put at risk – a new study is adding to the growing evidence that rampant destruction of nature will unleash future pandemics. Humanity stands at a crossroads: will it choose pathways to a healthy and sustainable future – along the lines of the 8 major transitions that Global Biodiversity Outlook 5 identifies as necessary to halt nature’s accelerating decline. Will we continue along the road to destruction? Will the next 10 years accelerate the transformative change we need, or be a disappointing “Aichi 2.0”?   There are a number of key steps towards this route to transformation. This includes the protection of 30% of the planet by 2030. The argument for doing this is getting ever stronger, with a recent analysis involving over 100 experts finding that the benefits of protecting 30% of Earth outweigh the costs by a factor of at least 5:1. For the Ocean, more and more countries are getting on board. Canada is the latest nation to join the Global Ocean Alliance of governments advocating for 30x30 (go Canada!), bringing the total to 22 states now signed up to the coalition launched by the UK in 2019. But it is impossible to protect 30% of the Ocean without mechanisms to close the gaping biodiversity governance gap and protect areas beyond national jurisdiction – something the long-anticipated High Seas Treaty is set to include. Hopefully the postponed treaty negotiations get back on track as quickly as possible. The latest is that they are tentatively scheduled for March 2021. In the meantime, the good news is that the BBNJ Treaty Conference launched a new Virtual Intersessional Programme of Work on 14th September, to keep the ball rolling on the talks on key elements of the treaty text. And even when we get the governance right, we see need to pay to protect. Another new report this month underscores the need to scale-up biodiversity financing five-fold. Governments need to remove their support for harmful subsidies – for fisheries, that amounts to about US$36bn per year. We need to redirect these harmful subsidies into biodiversity conservation, get rid of fuel and other harmful subsidies altogether, take proper account of the true value of nature that the financial system doesn’t recognize, and deploy the billions in additional financing needed to recover nature, closing the financing gap.   As the new Ocean League campaign launched by the Ocean Agency, UNEP and Adobe says, the power of creativity in driving positive change for Ocean protection and climate action has never been more relevant. Let’s hope creativity and commitment are out in force at the Biodiversity Summit – all our futures depend on it.     Time to take off our gloves in the icy fight for Antarctic protection 2020 has long been destined to be a big year for Antarctica – as the 200th anniversary of its discovery – and, as things stand today, it could even make history. The annual meeting of CCAMLR, usually held in Hobart, is currently scheduled to take place virtually from 26th October to 6th November, meaning the opportunity to secure the greatest ever act of Ocean protection by the end of the year is still possible. All we need is for the 26 Members to agree to long-standing proposals to create marine protected areas (MPAs) in East Antarctica, the Antarctic Peninsula, and Weddell Sea – well, really just 2 (China and Russia) as everyone else is on board. Together, these MPAs would protect almost 1% of the global Ocean by covering an incredible – and vital – almost 4 million km2.   So far, 2020 has brought only bad news for the great white continent. January brought Antarctica’s first ever recorded heatwave; February saw the highest ever recorded temperature of over 20 degrees Celsius; and in August a new study found that about 60% of the Antarctic ice shelf area is vulnerable to “hydrofracturing”, where meltwater seeps into crevasses and triggers collapse. Comparison of the latest satellite observations of polar ice melt found that the ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are already melting at Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) “worst-case-scenario” levels. That means we’re looking at 17cm of sea level rise by 2100 from those ice sheets alone, which would double the frequency of storm-surge flooding in many of the world's largest coastal cities.    But it is not too late to flip the script in 2020. Fortunately, some world leaders are prioritizing Antarctic protection. In her State of the Union 2020 address on 16th September, President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, declared that the EU “will use our diplomatic strength and economic clout to broker agreements that make a difference – such as designating maritime protected areas in the Antarctica. This would be one of the biggest acts of environmental protection in history.” Support the global campaign to build momentum in advance of the crucial CCAMLR meeting by signing and sharing the petition that calls on world leaders to protect Antarctica’s precious waters, and get the message out far and wide on you socials using this Call to Action toolkit.  -->      Ocean Signals – Short announcements The Ocean Race Summits held on 16th September was the latest in a series that brings together leaders and change-makers to focus on Ocean health. In 2020, those change-makers included our CEO Karen Sack, as well as Ocean Unite network members José María Figueres and Philippe Cousteau, while OU Network member Danni Washington was a co-host. Even better, during the Summit, Ocean Race announced that they are joining RISE UP! Watch the full replay of the Summit.   Only One is a newly launched platform for stories, solutions, and community action to protect the Ocean, tackle the climate crisis, and help build a more just, equitable planet – including an #Antarctica2020 campaign, which has collected more than 150,000 signatures from around the world. Follow @OnlyOne on Instagram to learn more.   It’s time to RISE UP for our Ocean! A new digital campaign is calling on organizations to sign on to #RiseUp4TheOcean and lend their voices to our growing Blue Call to Action. The campaign is centred around a beautiful film produced by the Oceano Azul Foundation narrated by Sylvia Earle that highlights the intimate connection between humans and the Ocean. Can you hear it?... It's now or never. Take 2 minutes to watch the video, listen to the Ocean and join the hundreds of organizations that are rising up.   The Outlaw Ocean Project: A virtual event on innovative storytelling for change, took place on 19th September. For more information on the project and event, click here.   On 5th October from 8-9.30PM BST, the Deep Sea Conservation Coalition (DSCC) will be hosting a unique online event, celebrating the role of the deep sea and all of the services it provides to humankind whilst asking the question, are we ready to mine? You can register for Deep Sea TV, here.   Ocean Book Club: Check out these 2 new books. Ocean Unite Network member, Philippe Cousteau, has announced the launch of his new children’s book ‘The Endangereds’ that tells the story of a group of endangered species that are rescued from nature and brought to a secret facility where they are given a serum that gives them hyper-intelligence. They become an A-Team for nature, traveling the world on fantastic adventures to thwart nefarious conspiracies against the planet. You can pre-order the book here. Another new read to add to your bookshelf: ‘ALL WE CAN SAVE: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis’ compiles provocative and illuminating essays from women at the forefront of the climate movement who are harnessing truth, courage, and solutions to lead humanity forward. Available to order here.   One Blue Ocean – an Ocean advocacy group that inspires change through positive visual images and creative works – is looking to recruit the best and brightest young people to serve on its Youth Advisory Board. YAB ambassadors are creative thinkers and thought leaders ready to dive deep to support the organization from their unique perspectives and be part of the Ocean of Change. To learn more or apply email tuennerman@oneblueocean.org or henthorne@oneblueocean.org.   Did you know that about 80% of the world’s wastewater is discharged – untreated or partially treated – into our lakes, rivers, streams, and the Ocean? It’s a truly filthy habit. So Our Shared Seas has launched a new Ocean Sewage Pollution Hub to identify and mobilize solutions on the impact of sewage pollution. This isn’t a niche issue. Ocean sewage pollution is a serious threat to Ocean – and human – health that flows largely under the noses of philanthropy, development aid, and regulators.   Join Ocean Unite to help ensure that 30% of the Ocean is protected by 2030 with our new range of sustainable ocean-inspired clothing. Saving the Ocean never looked so good!   Are you – or someone you know – a young filmmaker? How will you change the world? Create a film that tells your story (in 50 seconds or less!) and compete for US$12,000 in cash prizes for you and your school or organization by entering the Planet911 Youth Film Challenge. Don’t delay – the deadline is 15th October (topic 1) and 1st December (topic 2).   Attend a session during the upcoming Geneva Trade Week. Co-hosted by Pew, the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and the Friends of Ocean Action, the session titled “#StopFundingOverfishing” will taking place next Wednesday, 30th September. Register at genevatradeweek.ch. -->        Waves on the Horizon – What's coming up?  Better late than never – 2021 is the new, and hopefully improved, 2020  “Postponed”, “delayed”, “cancelled” – these have become the stock phrases of this year of living virtually. But, while we are all doing our best to debate and exchange ideas online, after 9 months in solitary confinement many people want to know: when will we meet again? So here is a round-up of how schedules currently stand for some of the key events.    First up, the 15th meeting of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP-15), originally scheduled for October 2020, is now planned for 17th-30th May 2021, in Kunming, China, with advance meetings of the scientific and implementation committees tentatively scheduled for the first quarter of 2021.   The other big environmental deferment of 2020, the UNFCCC COP26, will now take place, one year later than originally planned, from 1st-21st November 2021, in Glasgow, Scotland.   The IUCN has made the call to postpone the World Conservation Congress for a second time. It was due to be held in Marseilles in January and now we are awaiting a new set of dates.   The delayed 8th annual Economist World Ocean Summit and Expo will still be held in Lisbon, but from 2nd-4th March 2021.   Meanwhile, Davos regulars will have to rethink their alpine wardrobes as the usually freezing World Economic Forum has been shifted from January until the early summer, although digital ‘Davos Dialogues’ between key global leaders will take place during the week of 25th January.   Our Ocean 2020 is still set to go ahead in Palau from 7th-9th December, although it may go virtual.   And the postponed 26th Annual Meeting of the International Seabed Authority in Kingston, Jamaica, is now planned for late 2020. And many more events are yet to announce their new dates. Among the yet to be confirmed are the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon since April 2020; and the all-important 4th session of the intergovernmental conference to elaborate a legally binding instrument for marine biological diversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction – aka the High Seas Treaty – which will be convened at earliest possible date to be decided by the General Assembly, hopefully March 2021.   Paris Peace Forum – turning the page on the pandemic The Paris Peace Forum was created in 2018 to respond to the ongoing crisis of multilateralism, which has sharply increased in 2020. From 11th-13th November 2020, the Forum will devote its 3rd edition to projects and initiatives from around the world aimed at providing immediate responses to the COVID-19 crisis, improving our resilience in the medium term and rebuilding a more sustainable world. Taking place a week after the US elections, the 2020 Paris Peace Forum will provide a universal and inclusive platform for all actors involved in the response to the COVID crisis. The event is adopting a unique hybrid format – partly in person, partly online – and will be chiefly devoted to the multi-actor response to coronavirus and the opportunity to rebuild a more sustainable world.    A Call for Projects launched in March 2020 received more than 850 applications – a record since the creation of the Forum – from which 100 have been selected to participate at the Forum. One of these is the Ocean Risk and Resilience Alliance which, with its Ocean Resilience Innovation Challenge, aims to drive the foundation of a new marketplace catalyzing investment into coastal natural capital by identifying and nurturing a number of finance innovations that focus on building coastal resilience in the most exposed and vulnerable regions and communities. The innovation challenge is set to launch in mid-October, so keep an eye out for more info or follow @ORRAAnews on Twitter for more. It is the latest Ocean project to be promoted by the Paris Peace Forum, which includes the Antarctica2020 initiative to build support for Southern Ocean protection, and the High Seas Alliance’s work to protect half the planet through a strong High Seas Treaty, which were both chosen to be among the Forum’s 10 ‘scale-up projects’ in the past 2 years. -->        Ocean Reflection – A look back at what's been happening Mauritius oil tanker disaster – fueling trouble in paradise  On 25th July, a Japanese-owned oil tanker – the MV Wakashio – ran aground at Pointe d'Esny near the coast of Mauritius and 2 weeks later began leaking fuel oil. Satellite images in early August showed the oil spill stretched out between the mainland at Pointe D'Esny and the island of Ile-aux-Aigrettes. It is estimated that about 1200 tonnes of fuel oil have spilled out along the coast. But it is the location rather than the size of the spill which makes it so serious. The oil is leaking near environmentally protected marine ecosystems including the Blue Bay Marine Park reserve, a wetland of international importance. The unique Mauritian marine environment is home to 1700 species, including around 800 types of fish, 17 kinds of marine mammals, and two species of turtles. The pristine turquoise waters of the blue lagoon outside the coastal village of Mahébourg, world famous for tourists and as the backdrop for numerous Bollywood movies, are now stained black and brown.   To support the people of Mauritius, who are calling for more action to address the spill and protect the local community and wildlife, a campaign has been launched inviting people to sign a letter to the Prime Minister asking for a transparent, effective clean-up that enables the long-term recovery of the environment and livelihoods of Mauritian people. Uniting for Caribbean action Ocean Unite collaborated with the Caribbean Biodiversity Fund (CBF), the Caribbean Challenge Initiative, the Bahamas Protected Areas Fund and The Nature Conservancy to co-organize the very first Virtual CCI-CBF Week from 13th-16th July 2020. The week was defined by several high-level panels with special messages delivered by Sir Richard Branson and H.E. Peter Thomson, the UN Special Envoy for Oceans, who both highlighted the importance of enhancing political advocacy and regional action towards the protection of 30% of the Ocean by 2030. Panelists and speakers all embraced a vision for transformative action, and in particular the evolution of the Caribbean’s tourism industry as it moves beyond the incapacitating economic shocks caused by more frequent natural disasters and, now, pandemics. There is huge opportunity in the Caribbean to embrace new, innovative and practical solutions. But participants agreed that the existing policy must be accompanied by a sustainable financing architecture to build onto the success of the Caribbean Biodiversity Fund that has been financing the building of a network of effectively managed MPAs in the region. Hopefully the Caribbean continues to be a beacon of Ocean ambition as they further develop their priorities towards 2030. Maldives deeper into coral reef research  The Maldives Coral Institute (MCI) was publicly launched in February 2020 with a successful workshop and the inaugural coral festival in Thulusdhoo, Kaafu Atoll. Since then, no time has been wasted in getting several research projects underway, 2 of which were showcased at a lively event in September. Professor Callum Roberts of Exeter University gave a presentation on ‘Scientific research on Maldivian coral reefs: Past, present, and future needs’, while Georgia de Jong Cleyndert (MCI, University of York) focused on ‘Managing development to protect coral reefs.’ The event was well attended and those who joined engaged in spirited debates and a panel discussion moderated by journalist Zaheena Rasheed, where the presenters were joined by guest speakers Dr. Kathryn Mengerink (Waitt Institute), Dr. David Obura (CORDIO/ IUCN/ University of Queensland) and Shaha Hashim (Blue Marine Foundation). These initial studies, collating information from a wide range of sources, will prove invaluable as the MCI advances its mission to protect the future of Maldivian coral reefs – which will be valuable for reefs globally. The entire webinar can be viewed online. --> Other Key News The muddy waters of US Ocean protection   Paint: The big source of Ocean microplastics you didn’t know about   Galapagos: how to protect the islands' amazing marine life from huge Chinese fishing fleet   Treasure and turmoil in the deep sea   The UK could become first country in Europe to ban shark fin trade after Brexit   Coronavirus: Pandemic 'causing new wave' of plastic pollution   Unsustainable fishing worsens threats to Great Barrier Reef   How our changing climate will make hurricanes worse    When the day’s catch includes cocaine and heroin   Scientists: Sea floor mining is basically as bad as it sounds   Ocean justice: where social equity and the climate fight intersect   Unmasking China's invisible fleet   Mangrove protections can provide conservation wins   To stem illegal fishing, project shines light on at-sea transfer of fish --> Recent Reports Human Rights at Sea Fisheries report   Study finds sharks are ‘functionally extinct’ in 20% of reefs observed   New report on how better data can help keep plastic out of the Ocean    Study finds that Ocean warming has seafloor species headed in the wrong direction   Study shows more than half of the Ocean is already being affected by climate change   New compendium report from Nature4Climate on nature-positive recovery   New research on the benefits from the waste produced by seabirds   New report released by the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy   New report shows worrisome signs emerging for 1.5 degrees Celcius climate target   Study finds that 6 in 10 fish species could face reproductive failure as temperatures rise   Study quantifies women’s long-overlooked contribution to fisheries to nearly US$5.6bn per year Click here for more reports --> Latest Blogs Empower and support coastal communities by Vivienne Solís Rivera and Kim Sander Wright. Young ocean leaders stand against deep-seabed mining by Sustainable Ocean Alliance. Speeding up the transition towards a sustainable economy by Dr. Monica Verbeek.   Click here for more blogs --> We get amazing feedback every month from avid Navigator readers. We want to make sure to always bring you high-quality content and that the global seaview continues.  Donate now to Ocean Unite to keep it coming! DONATE NOW Remember to pass on any of your Ocean news to navigator_info@oceanunite.org Help support our efforts to protect the Ocean by wearing one of Ocean Unite's cool and sustainable t-shirts or hoodies. Don’t want to keep receiving these updates? Unsubscribe here. 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09/24/2020 - 08:39
The 2.5m-year-old tree would be first plant species protected by law in state as current habitat increasingly becomes less viable The western Joshua tree will be considered for protection under the California Endangered Species Act, possibly becoming the first plant species to be given protection of law in the state because of a primarily climate crisis-related threat. The California Fish and Game Commission voted Tuesday to accept a petition that provides the gnarly-limbed yucca plants protected status for a year while the state conducts a study. The Joshua tree – which is not a tree but is actually a succulent called Yucca brevifolia – has graced the landscape of the Mojave desert for 2.5m years. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 05:00
The potentially dangerous chemicals are ubiquitous and used in numerous consumer products. Here’s what to know PFAS compounds are ubiquitous, used in a range of products, from food-delivery boxes to non-stick cookware to stain-resistant clothing. But one of the most troubling routes to PFAS exposure is drinking water that has been contaminated by discharges from factories and other facilities. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 05:00
The federal government has still not set limits for PFAS compounds, and some allege that could be because it is a polluter of them itself This story is co-published with Consumer Reports In 2014, residents of Horsham Township, near Philadelphia, learned that their water had been contaminated with potentially toxic chemicals linked to an array of health problems, including learning delays in children and cancer. Those residents include Frank and Lisa Penna, who allege in a lawsuit that their water was among the contaminated supplies. Known as PFAS, for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the chemicals in this class of approximately 5,000 substances have become notorious as much for their potential danger as for their perseverance. Because the chemical bonds that hold the compounds together don’t break down easily, they last a very long time – a reality that has led to a commonly used name for the group: “Forever chemicals.” Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 04:14
Exclusive: African state says it has agreements with oil companies in Lake Chad area Chad has asked to suspend an application for world heritage site status for Lake Chad to explore oil and mining opportunities in the region, it can be revealed. In a letter leaked to the Guardian, Chad’s tourism and culture minister wrote to Unesco, the body which awards the world heritage designation, asking to “postpone the process of registering Lake Chad on the world heritage list”. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 04:00
Mitch McConnell has long resisted climate action even as the farm and coal sectors suffer, but a growing movement could bring change April 15. That’s the traditional frost-free date in Schochoh, the small community in south-central Kentucky, where Sam Halcomb and his family own and operate Walnut Grove Farms. Before then, the soft red winter wheat that Halcomb grows, which finds its way into McDonald’s biscuits and grocery store pancake mixes, is flowering and especially vulnerable to cold. The frost-free date is an estimate, based on years of experience. If you make it past that date, you’re likely to have a healthy harvest. This year, a freeze came on exactly April 15, with early morning temperatures dropping into the mid-20s Fahrenheit. “We were all smacking our heads, saying, ‘Ah, we almost made it’,” Halcomb said. Then, on May 9, another freeze hit. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 03:09
Shadow climate spokesman fronted Sky News to clarify earlier statement that gas would not underpin Australia’s future prosperity The shadow climate minister, Mark Butler, has walked back an observation that gas won’t underpin Australia’s prosperity in the 21st century after the remarks triggered a fresh round of consternation within Labor – including pushback from union leaders. In prepared remarks sent to a carbon farming forum on Wednesday, Butler said Australia had found itself with plentiful coal and gas in the 20th century, “making us one of the most prosperous societies in human history on the back of these fossil fuels”. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 02:05
Water minister Melinda Pavey had blamed local councils, but the auditor general points the finger at the state government A damning new report has laid blame for many western New South Wales regional towns almost running out of water during the drought squarely at the feet of the state government, saying it “has not effectively supported or overseen town water infrastructure planning since at least 2014”. When Dubbo, Tamworth, Walgett and other western NSW towns had to ration town water – and some even had to truck in drinking water – last summer, there was much finger pointing over who was to blame. Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 02:00
The president vowed to help the industry, but it continues shrinking despite his cuts to regulations Art Sullivan is considered something of a political heretic by other coalminers in south-western Pennsylvania, where a wave of support for Donald Trump based upon his flamboyant promises of a resurgence in coal helped propel the Republican to the US presidency. “Many of my coalminer friends voted for him,” said Sullivan, who has spent 54 years as a coalminer and, more latterly, consultant to a struggling industry. “They were deceived. Trump had no plan, no concept of how to resurrect the coal industry. My friends were lied to.” Continue reading...
09/24/2020 - 01:00
Which? singles out big brands for lack of environmentally conscious packaging Crisps, chocolate and cheese are among the worst foods for packaging recyclability, with big brands such as Pringles, KitKat and Babybel singled out for failing to do more to help the environment, a new investigation has claimed. The consumer group Which? analysed 89 of the UK’s best-selling branded groceries and found only a third (34%) had packaging that was fully recyclable in household collections. About four in 10 (41%) of items had no relevant labelling, leaving even environmentally conscious consumers in the dark about disposal. Continue reading...